Literary Ethnography

A blog about writing, creating, and representing culture

Eumerdification

stickyembraces:

"John Searle once told me about a conversation he had with the late Michel Foucault: "Michel, you’re so clear in conversation; why is your written work so obscure?" To which Foucault replied, "That’s because, in order to be taken seriously by French philosophers, twenty-five percent of what you…

Please ethnographers, no eumerdification!

“Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion.”

—   Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, philosopher (1770-1831) 
amandaonwriting:

PHD Comics: The Neurobiology of Writing


Oh so true!

“To write ethnography is to see into the minds of your earthly kin.”

—   literary ethnography

Ted Fischer | Professor of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University | Big Think

The anthropology of love.

“In the country of the blind, who are not as unobservant as they look, the one-eyed is not king, he is spectator.”

—   Clifford Geertz, "From the Native’s Point of View": On the Nature of Anthropological Understanding (via allstorynoreflection)

“[After the collapse of communism in 1989] it was easy to take the line [that] many people who shared ideals that we shared, and had been willing to fight and die for them, had actually wound up committing genuine crimes. And if that is the outcome of people who are willing to live and die for ideals, maybe the world would be better off without them. I think it was an understandable conclusion, [but] not a correct conclusion. I think we are still reeling from that conclusion.”

—   Philosopher Susan Neiman from the Big Think - http://bigthink.com/users/susanneiman

“Creative minds are uneven, and the best of fabrics have their dull spots.”

—   HP Lovecraft, (1890-1937) 
I need a good caption for this stock photo.  Anyone want to help?

I need a good caption for this stock photo.  Anyone want to help?

A Report from the European Association of Social Anthropologists' meetings in Tallin

An interesting reflection on this year’s EASA meetings on the Savage Minds anthropology blog.